Result

2022

Financial stability risks are increasing on the back of rising interest rates and a weakening economy

Rising interest rates, decreased risk-taking and a slowing economy are weighing on highly indebted commercial real estate firms and households. The rapid transition to higher interest rates and a decreased willingness to take risk means financial stability risks have increased since spring. At the same time, this transition may lead to lower risk-taking and indebtedness in the long run, thus lowering stability risks.

The countercyclical buffer rate will be raised

FI has decided to raise the countercyclical buffer rate to 2 per cent, which is its neutral level. This was already communicated in the report Stability in the Financial Markets. Due to the 12-month implementation period, this rate will start to go into effect at the end of June 2023.

Rising interest rates put pressure on indebted households and firms

Interest rates are rising rapidly in the wake of high inflation. High interest rates and lower risk appetite are placing downward pressure on risk-taking and asset prices. In the long term, this can slow the growth of debt and benefit financial stability. However, the large debts that built up over the extended period of low interest rates are putting pressure on highly indebted households and firms.

Many households are sensitive to higher interest rates

New mortgagors took out loans that were 12 per cent larger last year than in 2020. The average loan-to-value ratio for new mortgagors rose from 307 to 327 per cent. This is the highest figure since FI started its mortgage survey. The stricter amortisation requirement has slowed rising loan-to-income ratios. The high debt means that borrowers’ personal finances are under more pressure when interest rates rise.

2021

Resilience is needed as the risks in the commercial real estate sector increase

The economic recovery has been stronger than expected this year, in part due to strong support measures during the pandemic. At the same time, risks are building up, writes Finansinspektionen (FI) in its second stability report of the year. The report is being presented today by Director General Erik Thedéen and Chief Economist Henrik Braconier at a press conference.

FI raises the countercyclical buffer rate to 1 per cent

Finansinspektionen (FI) has decided to raise the countercyclical buffer rate to 1 per cent. The new buffer rate will be applied as of 29 September 2022. Until then, the buffer rate will remain at 0 per cent.

FI intends to raise the countercyclical buffer rate to 1 per cent

Finansinspektionen (FI) intends to raise the countercyclical buffer rate to 1 per cent in Q3 2021.

Mortgages must be amortised again

The rules on amortisation go into effect as normal again after 31 August. The temporary exemption that Finansinspektionen (FI) introduced due to the exceptional uncertainty in the economy during the spring of 2020 is now ending. This means that households with high loan-to-value and debt-to-income ratios must amortise their mortgages.

FI will not extend its recommendation regarding dividends

Uncertainty is decreasing, and the economy is continuing to recover. Therefore, the recommendation regarding restrictions on dividends will not be extended. The recommendation ends on 30 September 2021.

Support measures can build up stability risks

The support measures have been important for offsetting the economic impact of the crisis and speeding up the recovery. However, they can also contribute to greater stability risks in the long run, concludes Finansinspektionen (FI) in this year’s first report on the stability in the financial system, which is being published today.

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